1. hills? Of laundry I guess. #type #logo #illustration #cutestorefront #ohio #vintage

    hills? Of laundry I guess. #type #logo #illustration #cutestorefront #ohio #vintage

  2. Clearly stated on page 1,324. 

    Clearly stated on page 1,324. 

  3. Happy July 4th! May you eat, laugh, celebrate, make tents with vintage fabrics. Whatever floats your patriotic boat. xoxo (Taken with Instagram)

    Happy July 4th! May you eat, laugh, celebrate, make tents with vintage fabrics. Whatever floats your patriotic boat. xoxo (Taken with Instagram)

  4. A delightful little farmhouse pen and ink drawing by Columbus, Ohio artist Evan Puckett. This is a digital print on archival linen paper. Framed in a handmade plywood frame with glass. The size is 17.5” x 15.5”. (via "Magic Mayhem" by Evan Puckett by Opal Stackhouse on Storenvy)

    A delightful little farmhouse pen and ink drawing by Columbus, Ohio artist Evan Puckett. This is a digital print on archival linen paper. Framed in a handmade plywood frame with glass. The size is 17.5” x 15.5”. (via "Magic Mayhem" by Evan Puckett by Opal Stackhouse on Storenvy)

  5. Meet my companions at Opal Stackhouse: Change Girl and Bouncer.

    They are original posters from the Harold’s Club Casino. Harold’s Club began on February 23rd, 1935 (Anniversary, HEY!) in Reno, Nevada by Raymond “Pappy” Smith, and his son Harold Smith Sr. These posters are from 1950’s, which was the height of the casino’s popularity with Harold’s Club being the biggest casino in the state. Sadly, this was also the era when Harold Smith Sr’s gambling and partying got the best of him. He divorced, lost most of his money and spent some time in a mental institution. Apparently, he pulled through, as he and his brother and father continued to run the casino until “Pappy” died in 1967. Billionaire Howard Hughes bought Harold’s Club in 1970. Harold’s younger brother Raymond remained part of the business, while Harold retired. Harold continued to gamble his fortune away and enjoy many a whiskey smash. Harold’s Club closed in the 90’s and was demolished. Harrah’s courtyard entrance now stands in it’s place. 

    These historical vintage characters are sure to make a statement wherever you choose to display them. The details in the illustrations never get old. They would be great in a bar or restaurant. I’d design a whole dining room around these these two charmers in a heartbeat. They really make a room feel like a good ol’ time. 

    Change Girl: Framed, 74” x 24” $275

    Bouncer: Framed, 74” x 29” $325

  6. Well hello little friend…………………………illustration by Martin Blenkinsopp

    Well hello little friend…………………………illustration by Martin Blenkinsopp

  7. Botanical illustration from the …50’s? 60’s? It’s from an old book of shrubs. Hello shrubland, I love your shrubbery .

    Botanical illustration from the …50’s? 60’s? It’s from an old book of shrubs. Hello shrubland, I love your shrubbery .